Sustainable Home Textiles

Craftscurator's Forecast for PantoneView

Mar 09, 2015 by Irene Vermeulen

In the home textiles industry many new developments can be observed to make better, more sustainable products. Research is being done to create new cellulose yarn from mais, milk or renewable bamboo fibers; microalgae pigments are being used as printing ink and do not fade over time, but brighten; smart textiles are being developed to monitor well-being, and designers rediscover the outstanding workmanship of far away places, and the traditional making industries of their home countries.

Craftscurator is part of the PantoneView team of trend experts, and is publishing a series of reports on sustainability, containing inspiring visuals with examples of sustainability in product design, in-depth analysis and colour cards. This is a summary of the publication in which Craftscurator gives a forecast on new and better materials, treatments, manufacturing and experience.

Better materials
New sources of raw material are explored by designers and manufacturers: from sea algae to sugar cane. Research is being done to create new cellulose yarn from mais, milk or renewable bamboo fibers. Animal fibers are rediscovered for their natural ability to trap warmth. Materials are fibery, coarse and textured, while colours are soft and pale.

Better treatments
Natural, vegetable, even algae pigments are used as new sources for dye stuff and printing ink for textiles. The effects are amazing: the fast-growing microalgae used for Blond & Bieber's prints on textiles does not fade over time, but brightens! Contrary to synthetic colors, where the shade is only determined by one molecule, the natural color of vegetable dyes is determined by 15 different substances. This gives a rich and natural color to the dyed end product that can hardly be equaled by chemical products.

Better manufacturing
Whether it is local or global, manufacturing involves people and affect their communities. Designers rediscover the outstanding workmanship of far away places, and the traditional making industries of their home countries. More and more businesses ensure safe, sound and even joyful working conditions. Textiles reflect their origin, and traditional details are highlighted in minimal designs. The color palette is influenced by workman's overalls and machines.

Better experience
'We are people, not consumers' was one of the statements at this year's trend presentation at Heimtextil 2015, where 'Experience' was the overarching theme. People are taking back control over the products they buy, want to tweak them, personalize them, and influence the making process. Better experience also means a better performance, and smart textiles are now being developed to monitor well-being, or prevent illness or offer comfort.


Cover picture: Tinctorial Textiles by Raw Color in collaboration with Ecological Textiles | Nina Gautier | Studio Pluis | Marcin Rusak | Tjeerd Veenhoven | Nienke Hoogvliet | Blond & Bieber | Nanimarquina | Rudi Boiten | The London Cloth Company | Stefan Auberg |

Better Manufacturing, Craft Technqiues
by Nanimarquina
Better Experience, 3DIY
by Rudi Boiten
Better Experience, Custom Made
by Rudi Boiten
Better Manufacturing, Local Production
The London Cloth Company
Better Experience, DIY
by Stefan Auberg
PantoneView
Forecast
Better Materials, Nettle Fiber
by Nina Gautier
Better Treatments, Flower Pigments
by Marcin Rusak
Better Materials, Animal Fibers
by Studio Pluis
Better Treatments, Flowers on Fabric
by Marcin Rusak
Better Materials, Flower Pigments
by Tjeerd Veenhoven
Better Materials, Sea Algae Yarn
by Nienke Hoogvliet
Better Treatments, Printing with Algae Ink
by Blond & Bieber